NaMoReMO


Hello, World!
Here are the instructions to this month’s Absolute Write Blog Chain!

In the spirit of NaNoWriMo, write a mock review of a writing project that you have done or would like to do. Make sure to either give a brief, one-sentence description of what the project is or work it into the review somehow. You can review anything (poetry, prose, collected blog posts) and in any way you like (funny, serious, Dadaist).

And here are the participating blogs:

Participants and posts:
orion_mk3: http://nonexistentbooks.wordpress.com (link to post)
Ralph Pines – http://ralfast.wordpress.com (link to post)
bmadsen – https://hospitaloflife.wordpress.com (link to post)
dolores haze – http://dianedooley.wordpress.com (link to post)
SRHowen – http://srhowen1.blogspot.com (link to post)
Angyl78 – http://jelyzabeth.wordpress.com (link to post)
writingismypassion – http://charityfaye.blogspot.com/ (link to post)
meowzbark – http://www.lizzylessard.com/ (link to post)
pyrosama – http://matrix-hole.blogspot.com/ (link to post)
randi.lee – http://emotionalnovel.blogspot.com/ (link to post)

wonderactivist – http://luciesmoker.wordpress.com (link to post)

Here’s the post:

Chad Sorrens is a young and talented soldier facing his biggest challenge yet: to survive Project Archangel. In B.M.’s first novel, Project Archangel, the protagonist faces a series of challenges outlined by an underground terrorist war in Russia. Written at the age of 15, this novel has predictable twists and turns, but does have a gem somewhere beneath the troupes.

Within the gunfights, clichΓ© love scenes and crummy dialogue we are forced to endure if we want to finish the novel, there is a harsh criticism towards war and the psychological turmoil soldiers endure. Sorrens, in the end of Project Archangel, regrets every second he spend holding a machine gun in the middle of the Russian Winter. Not because of himself, but because of the changed lives around him.

Overall Project Archangel, at 120 thousand words, is an ambitious creation by a young writer with much to learn. If the book is left to mature (and the writer) for a couple of years, it just might turn into a decent novel comparable with Ludlum, Forsyth and the earlier Clancy.

The review is of my very first book.

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18 responses

  1. Pingback: AW Blog Chain: National Mock Review Month |

  2. My first novel was half a mil words. It will never see the light of day. Perhpas pulling the gems and putting them in a new story will bring it to life?

    • Half a mil? Wow! Indeed, there are times in which I say: this bit and this other bit, they make for a good short book and I’ve been wanting to pick up on it. Cheers!

  3. “Left to age like a fine wine, the book has potential when the passage of time means the author isn’t afraid to hill his darlings and take up the Sword of Editing :)”

    I kid. Sounds interesting! 120k is a lot by the standards of a romance or, say NaNoWriMo, but it’s still in the sweet spot that publishers like to see.

      • I’m sure! I still have a soft spot for my first completed novel too. But as Stephen King says, often what needs to be done to shepherd a project like that to publication equates to “killing one’s darlings.”

        Of course since he is a big famous author he never has to do that anymore and his stories are puffier than a marshmallow fugu πŸ™‚

  4. Pingback: Book Review: The Adventures of Muffy by Lizzy Lessard - Lizzy's Dark Fiction | Lizzy's Dark Fiction

  5. Pingback: November 2012 Blog Chain « J Elyzabeth's Blog

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